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You don't mention whether you have an HVAC system, but the image suggests that you do not. If you DO, then it is expected to have stable temperatures. If NOT, then the solar influence, including shading from adjacent buildings may affect interior temperature. Also, the mass difference between mud bricks with rice husk is probably very similar to mud bricks alone, making the lag in temperature conductance small. I don't know, however, what insulation difference exists...

You don't mention whether you have an HVAC system, but the image suggests that you do not. If you DO, then it is expected to have stable temperatures. If NOT, then the solar influence, including shading from adjacent buildings may affect interior temperature. Also, the mass difference between mud bricks with rice husk is probably very similar to mud bricks alone, making the lag in temperature conductance small. I don't know, however, what insulation difference exists...exists... Hmmm... 1 air change per hour is significant, but not a "hurricane". It will, however, make mitigate temperature changes. I read the abstract and see that it refers to thermal properties, but does not mention the impact on the interior of a building (which is what you are doing).Just because a building has better insulation does not tell you a lot about the impact on interior temperature, particularly over the span of multiple solar cycles. In the case of mud bricks, the mass and thermal lag will also have an impact. All in all, I think I'd confirm in every way you can that the model has proper inputs, then carefully review performance differences to understand why the insulation has lower impact than expected - such as lower density due to increased insulation... Enjoy the investigation!