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You do want to use a Coil:Cooling:Water and a Coil:Heating:Water, served by your geothermal object.

TL;DR;

I think you might have a problem with the terminology here, and that's what creating the confusion.

DX stands for direct expansion. It means that it's the refrigerant that is in the coil placed in the air stream. The refrigerant is expanded, evaporates, and therefore provides useful cooling to the air stream.

Coil:Cooling:Water is a coil is placed in an air stream and has a fluid in it (typically water, or water + glycol). This coil is therefore also placed on the demand side of a plant loop. Said plant loop can have whatever you want on the supply side: a chiller for example (like the measures you're talking about), but it could be a geothermal object too.

Similarly, the Coil:Heating:Water can be served by a plantLoop with a geothermal object.

You do want to use a Coil:Cooling:Water and a Coil:Heating:Water, served by your geothermal object.

TL;DR;

I think you might have a problem with the terminology here, and that's what creating the confusion.confusion (or I have a problem with your terminology and didn't understand, that's a possibility too)

DX stands for direct expansion. It means that it's the refrigerant that is in the coil placed in the air stream. The refrigerant is expanded, evaporates, and therefore provides useful cooling to the air stream.

Coil:Cooling:Water is a coil is placed in an air stream and has a fluid in it (typically water, or water + glycol). This coil is therefore also placed on the demand side of a plant loop. Said plant loop can have whatever you want on the supply side: a chiller for example (like the measures you're talking about), but it could be a geothermal object too.

Similarly, the Coil:Heating:Water can be served by a plantLoop with a geothermal object.