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what are the parameters for selection of city for investigating a newly developed daylight device on daylight performance?

asked 2014-11-09 15:54:07 -0600

hema's avatar

updated 2020-01-20 13:44:22 -0600

I have to select 3 cities for daylight performance.

@Neal : On what basis I select Delhi,Ahmedabad and Chennai. 1. Different latitudes (Delhi: 28.6100° N, 77.2300° E,Ahmedabad: 23.0300° N,72.5800° E,Chennai13.0839° N, 80.2700° E) 2 Change in sun's inclination But I want to understand if I am using a newly developed daylight device, how will i compare this for all the three latitude cities. there should be something common in weather data.

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@hema. Are you asking whether a 4 degree change in latitude is significant? Or something else?

__AmirRoth__'s avatar __AmirRoth__  ( 2014-11-09 16:27:29 -0600 )edit

Take a look at this solar map for India ( http://headwaysolar.com/blog/wp-conte... ). The three locations you've picked are all on the high side of solar availability, which seems to vary more by longitude than by latitude (probably has something to do with the Monsoons). I would suggest that you also add a location in the east with much reduced solar potential, e.g., Kolkata (Calcutta).

Joe Huang's avatar Joe Huang  ( 2014-11-11 23:28:51 -0600 )edit

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answered 2014-11-10 13:31:20 -0600

Joe Huang's avatar

I'm puzzled by this question. It seems you're assuming the predominant driver in daylighting potential is the latitude, which is true only in the crudest sense, because there are many other factors such as the atmospheric turbidity and the amount of clouds. Instead of using latitude, I would pick a range of solar radiation as shown in the map posted earlier, and if you want only 3 locations to get a range, just pick locations with average, high, and low amounts of radiation :-)

Keep in mind the following when doing your analysis: (1) the illuminances in the weather files are all calculated based on the solar radiation, so take them with a grain of salt, (2) the illuminances shown have to be converted to the amounts entering vertical surfaces, i.e., windows, and can be expected to change greatly, (3) for India, ISHRAE released in early 2014 a new set of typical year weather files for 59 Indian locations with decent solar radiation calibrated against satellite-derived values (I was involved in that work); please contact Vikram Murthy at vikrammur@gmail.com on how to obtain those files.

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Thanks a lot !!

hema's avatar hema  ( 2014-11-11 12:04:39 -0600 )edit
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answered 2014-11-11 11:23:28 -0600

Hi @hema,

Again, your task: "I have to select 3 cities for daylight performance", seems arbitrary. You have a daylight device you'd like to test, apparently for performance across India. It's been stated here that simply changing latitude is not the whole story. Neal was suggesting targeting population centers across the country; Joe and I both suggested that in addition to the change in inclination, other factors affect the climate and in turn the solar availability, and in turn the performance of your device.

The beauty of climate-based simulation is that you can see how local climate affects the performance of one or more changes to a design, and you can do it relatively rapidly. In your case especially, where you wish to deploy the same device on a given building type(s), it's a matter of changing the climate file, maybe some constructions and schedules, and re-running the analysis, per building type. This is easy to do with most of the tools we talk about here every day.

So, again, the best suggestions are to spread your analysis locations around latitudinally, but also look at the climate files (with the visualization tool of your choice) and other tools like the ones Neal already posted, to try and bound the problem as best you can. I would definitely suggest simulating the device in more than three cities, as well.

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Thanks a lot !!

hema's avatar hema  ( 2014-11-11 12:04:25 -0600 )edit
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answered 2014-11-09 17:22:24 -0600

updated 2014-11-09 17:31:10 -0600

What analysis do you plan to do with these locations? If it is strictly solar-related (e.g., PV, Solar hot water, or shading) then you might want to select latitudes that represent the range of human population:

Text

There are also several maps available which show global solar insolation. These can help select locations that might be meaningful for your study as well. A quick Google image search for "solar resource map latitude" gives several options like this:

If you need characteristics other than solar information, you might want to also select locations based on some climate zone definition.

There is no theory, rule of thumb, or body of work that I know of that speaks to the distance at which two weather locations are significantly different. Ultimately, the impact of changing 4 degrees will depend on what you are investigating. For some analyses, like commercial building energy usage, 4 degrees difference might not have any significant impact, but if you are looking at the output of a PV system, then the only way to know if 4 degrees latitude makes a significant difference may be to perform the sensitivity study yourself.

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Thanks for the answer, Actually I am doing daylight performance analysis. For this I need to select latitude cities. Now If i have to select from India on what basis I can select?

hema's avatar hema  ( 2014-11-10 07:14:42 -0600 )edit

@hema Can you edit your question to reflect that you are looking for Indian climates for daylighting - and perhaps add the "daylighting" tag? If you're looking only at India, then I would select weather data for three large cities with somewhat equal latitude spacing that covers India's range of latitude: Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai.

Neal Kruis's avatar Neal Kruis  ( 2014-11-10 09:37:00 -0600 )edit

@hema I'd also add that daylighting "ain't just latitude". Local daylight availability is influenced by more than just the angle of the sun. Depending on the region, you could have several variations on daylight availability at the same latitude, even in the same season. This is why climate-based daylight modeling is so valuable.

rpg777's avatar rpg777  ( 2014-11-10 09:48:38 -0600 )edit

@Neal : That is exactly my question: Why I am selecting Delhi,Ahmedabad and Chennai. 1. Different latitudes (Delhi: 28.6100° N, 77.2300° E,Ahmedabad: 23.0300° N,72.5800° E,Chennai13.0839° N, 80.2700° E) 2 Change in sun's inclination

But I want to understand if I am using a newly developed daylight device, how will i compare this for all the three latitude cities. there should be something common in weather data.

hema's avatar hema  ( 2014-11-11 08:17:56 -0600 )edit

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Asked: 2014-11-09 15:54:07 -0600

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Last updated: Nov 11 '14